Added Light

Pushing the limits

Pushing the limits

Some shots make you work more than others, and some shots make your gear work more than others. This photo is an example of a shot that made both me and my gear work at our hardest. So much so that I genuinely wasn’t sure if it would actually work at all. But why was it so hard to do? Well, very simply, I was working right at the limits of what my gear could achieve.

Turning a castle into a pride flag

Turning a castle into a pride flag

When I spoke to Eoin and Alan in the run up to their wedding day, and again on the morning of it, they told me they would be flying the Pride flag from the top of Waterford Castle for their wedding, so I naturally included it in some photos during the wedding day. But the idea of the flag flying over the castle also planted a seed in my head – to see if I could turn the castle itself into a homage to the flag. So while they sat for dinner with their guests, I set out to see if it was possible.

When to Add Light

When to Add Light

So you have a flash, you know how to use it (at least in a basic sense), and you know what it does. But what about the question of when to use it. What are the things that should inform your decision to add light to a photograph? In the first of two posts on this topic, today we’ll focus on adding light to solve problems.

Shot in 106 Seconds

Shot in 106 Seconds

It’s a stormy day, you’ve had limited scope for any particularly creative photographs so far, and you want to capture a stand out photo for the couple. Outdoors isn’t looking promising, the drinks reception location is busy and the only option is the marquee that’s soon to be used for the dinner. But how to get creative in such a space?

Problem solving with flash

Problem solving with flash

There are two routes you can take when moving beyond bounced flash to expand your knowledge – one path involves a realisation that that there’s a need to understand how flash works, and to learn how to take control of it for practical purposes of creating nice light when the available light is bad. The other path involves embracing the ability of flash photography to enhance your creativity. Playing the long game pays dividends.